Archive Page 2

28
Oct
10

Olive in poster for Goldsmiths’ event

Our good friend Red Chidgey sent us in the post a poster featuring Olive that she found at Goldsmiths, University of London.

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05
Sep
10

Red Pepper – Do you remember Olive Morris?

CHIDGEY, Red (August/September 2010) Do you remember Olive Morris?. London: Red Pepper, no. 173, pp. 34-35.

An article by DIY feminist historian Red Chidgey, on using blogs to reclaim feminist histories, focusing on the Remember Olive Collective.

You can read full article in Red’s blog.

09
Aug
10

absolute Feminismus

ANKELE, Gudrun (Ed) 2010. absolute Feminismus. Freigburg: Orange Press.

The image of Olive Morris is gracing the cover of a new book published in Germany. The book contains texts, manifestos, poems and songs by women activists from all times, including Simon de Beauvoir, Rosi Braidotti, Guerrilla Girls, Sushila Mesquita, Beatriz Preciado, Joan Riviere and Sojourner Truth.

It can be purchased online but be warned, it is written in German!.

23
Jan
10

Do you remember Olive Morris? Publication

COLIN, A., FORD, T., LOPEZ DE LA TORRE, A., SPRINGER, K. (eds) 2010. Do you remember Olive Morris?. London: Gasworks and Remembering Olive Collective.

The publication was the final outcome of the Do you remember Olive Morris? project, and was launched on Saturday 23 January 2010 with an event in Gasworks. The texts, articles, essays and inteviews included in this publication are organised in two categories: History and Remembrance/Legacy. The fist part provides a context to Olive Morris’ life and times, her work as an activist and that of her contemporaries. While the contributions largely focus on the British context, some draw parallels with movements and actions that took place in the 1970s in the US. The second part records the work and experiences of the many contributors to Do you remember Olive Morris? The publication also includes a selection of poems celebrating the spirit of Olive Morris and of her times, and is illustrated with historical photographs of the UK Black Panther Movement by Neil Kenlock, and of the many activities that made up the Do you remember Olive Morris? project.


The publication can be purchased at:

Lambeth Archives, Minet Library, 52 Knatchbull Road, London SE5 9QY
Black Cultural Archives, 1 Othello Close, London SE11 4RE

The publication is available on loan from all public libraries in Lambeth and for reference at many other libraries and resource centres including:
Iniva Library – London
Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre – Manchester
Chelsea College of Art and Design and Camberwell College of Arts Libraries – London
Institute of Race Relations – London
56a Infoshop Social Centre – London

We are hoping to publish the book in the blog as a series of dowloadable PDFs and to make sales available online.

25
Nov
09

Olive Morris in Austria

A friend of ROC has emailed us a picture of a poster for a feminist poster she came across in Austria! Olive is travelling…

22
Nov
09

History of Feminism Network – New exhibition Do you remember Olive Morris?

New exhibition Do you remember Olive Morris? Listing
22 November 2009, History of Feminism Network website

Visit post

11
Nov
09

The Voice – Remembering Olive Morris

Remembering Olive Morris by by Janelle Oswald
11 November 2009, The Voice and The Voice Online

An exhibition honouring this important, but largely forgotten black British activist opens this month. Janelle Oswald looks at the life of a ‘radical sister’.

If you have not shopped in Brixton lately you may be unaware of the new local ‘currency’ circulating in the south London neighbourhood.

Launched as a business initiative to encourage residents to ‘buy local’, the ‘Brixton pound’ notes feature a range of local historical figures. On the one pound note, the young black woman holding a megaphone to her mouth is one of Brixton’s lesser-known community figures, Olive Morris.

Born in Jamaica in 1952, Morris moved with her family to Britain at nine, and went on to become a passionate and committed community organiser and activist.

Read full story