09
Sep
18

Olive’s biography in Face2Face Africa

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https://face2faceafrica.com/article/she-was-a-pioneer-black-female-activist-who-fought-for-womens-rights-in-britain-but-died-at-27

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17
Jun
18

Claudette Johnson poster of Olive Morris

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Taking the Women’s Suffrage movement as a point of departure, Camden VOX has commissioned four women artists to produce a series of posters that explore ideas of Equality, Place, Power and Identity. The first project, by Claudette Johnson, features a series of posters she created in homage to leading black women activists, including Olive Morris. The posters are exhibited in the atrium at Swiss Cottage Library from June to 8 August at Swiss Cottage Library, free entrance, 10am-8pm.

Claudette Johnson first heard of Olive Morris (1952 – 1979) on a visit to the Abasindi Co-Op during a residency at Manchester Art Gallery in 1986. When walking into the centre, Johnson was told “You look like Olive.” Morris was a vibrant and fearless activist on all kinds of fronts: for women, for black people, for the poor and for the dispossessed. The experience of attending the OWAAD (Organisation of Women of Asian and African Descent) conference, which Morris co-founded, had a profound effect on Johnson’s thinking as a first year Fine Art student in Manchester. Johnson describes Morris as an inspirational figure who illustrated what courage, intelligence and compassion can achieve in even a short period of time.

http://www.lovecamden.org/camden-vox-presents-claudette-johnson

29
Nov
14

Squatters’ homage

A nice tribute to Olive painted in the wall of the London Queer Social Centre on 432 Coldharbour Lane (ex-Joy). Photo: Alex Molano

Squat

01
Sep
14

Olive’s picture in Disobedient Objects

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A copy of the Squatter’s Handbook, where Olive appears climbing up the side of Railton Road’s squat, is included in Disobedient Objects at the Victoria and Albert Museum: “an exhibition about the art and design produced by grassroots social movements. It will show exhibits loaned from activist groups from all over the world, bringing together for the first time many objects rarely before seen in a museum”.

The exhibition runs from 26 July 2014 – 1 February 2015. There you can read short articles from the organisers and those who lent objects for the exhibition: http://www.vam.ac.uk/blog/section/disobedient-objects

22
Oct
13

Lambeth’s plans for Olive Morris House

This blog has been dormant for some time but I feel the need to re-start it due to Lambeth Council’s proposals to develop Olive Morris House  under its new SDP plans.  Many of you won’t be aware of Lambeth’s plans as they appear to have been rushed through with the minimum of community consultation.   Please see http://futurebrixton.org/your-new-town-hall/your-new-town-hall-get-involved/ and also http://www.brixtonblog.com/lambeth-council-accused-of-secrecy-over-town-hall-campus-plans/16929

I want to ensure that any future plans retain the memory of Olive’s contribution and that she continues to be suitably honoured and I will therefore be keeping a close eye on the plans for Olive Morris House

I will be posting updates on how we can influence the planned proposals.  Please watch this space.

11
Nov
11

The Olive Morris Memorial Awards Ceremony- 2 December! RSVP today

The Olive Morris Memorial Awards have been organised by the Remembering Olive Collective (ROC) to celebrate the legacy of black woman activist Olive Morris. The Awards were created as an opportunity to celebrate the spirit of Olive Morris as it lives on in the work of a new generation of young women activists.

Women aged between 16 and 27 years of age, of African or Asian descent and involved in grassroots political work of any nature were nominated for the awards by their friends, colleagues or mentors.  Of the nominees chosen to receive an award ROC will be honouring the work of:

Brenda May Goodchild—an artist creating powerful art for the current campaigns against the criminalisation of squatting in England and Wales;

Ria Hylton—involved in the Movement for Justice campaign against the deportation of Edson Comas;

Mirella—working with So We Stand, a UK-wide popular education collective focusing on struggles for environmental and social justice;

Nim Ralph—a founding member of So We Stand, working with communities across the UK to highlight the social and racial injustice of environmental issues. Also works with MOSAIC,  an anti-racist group in Brighton;

Rukayah Sarumi—has organised lectures on black feminism and the history of the women’s movement in Britain and is now active in Streatham Labour Party; and

Iman Hussein—for her work in the Guides Movement challenging its lack of diversity and with Roots a self-education Black History collective of 6th form college pupils.

Event details:

The awards event will take place at 7 – 9.30 on Friday 2 December 2011 at The Karibu Education Centre, 7 Gresham Road, London, SW9 7PH
Tickets £3 Inclusive of food
There will be a live DJ set by Carlos Martinez (Agent of Change)
Spaces are limited so booking is essential

PLEASE RSVP to: olivemorrishq@gmail.com

Award Press Release.doc

03
Apr
11

Remembering Anne Ward

Anne Ward – Photograph courtesy of Lambeth Archives.

Testimonial by ROC read at Anne’s Ward Memorial Service, 4 April 2011, St George’s Church. Anne Ward was Archivist at Lambeth Archives and a member of ROC from its inception.

On behalf of all the women who made up the Remembering Olive Collective (ROC), we’d like to express our deep sadness at the passing away of Anne Ward and share a few words in her honour.

As some of you may know, Anne was instrumental in putting together the Olive Morris Collection now deposited at Lambeth Archives.

All of us at ROC have fond and vivid memories of Anne. She was an incredibly generous, encouraging, and positive woman. Always ready to help and humbly share her time and knowledge, Anne trained us all in archiving and cataloguing.

Anne expressed genuine kindness, compassion, and great humour at all times. And she was a very supportive member of the group.

Her dedication to the Do you Remember Olive Morris oral history Project was unwavering, and she was a great source of advice for all aspects of ROC’s archiving work.

Apart from sharing her fabulous wealth of archiving knowledge, Anne also shared with us her own research tracing and recording the oral histories of Irish women – another courageous and important project that she worked on tirelessly.

A feminist by example, Anne was a true inspiration to many of us younger women and we will miss her terribly. It won’t be the same to go to Lambeth Archives without her being there. But her memory lives on and, like we remember Olive Morris, we will always remember her – the ever so cheerful Anne Ward.